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konnichiwa mina-san

Messagede Invite10013 » 29 Aoû 2014, 12:17

I hope it will not be inappropriate (although the topic after speaking orangutan ^^), I would like to ask a few questions about Japanese grammar, which I do not speak a word of which my understanding currently limit the expressions most commonly used in anime -yes I have an extensive culture. I try to improve myself, if not to learn the language more seriously in the future
At the moment I have a question that itches my feminism, I noticed that girls use watashi- and boys use ore- to speak in the first person, what is the reason?

PS : I use google because French is forbidden here, but I'm too bad in English to write correctly, I'm not also able to understand a quarter of my own text translated ... Sorry about that :uups:




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Re: konnichiwa mina-san

Messagede Invite10010 » 29 Aoû 2014, 13:10

When I tried to learn Japanese, I didn't notice differences, I used "watashi" for "I" (male or femelle or intersex ).

I hope the others will help you more...
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Re: konnichiwa mina-san

Messagede yapuka » 29 Aoû 2014, 14:27

"watashi" means "je" for male and female. But, like in french, japanese people can use slang, as for males : "boku" which means the same thing but in different degree of language.
I'm not sure but I think there are 7 ways to says "je" in japanese.
They use the same kind of difference when they use -kun for a boy and -chan for a girl.
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Re: konnichiwa mina-san

Messagede Luisão » 29 Aoû 2014, 14:54

"watashi" is neutral and can be used by both male and female. That's the basic word to say "I", one of the first you will learn. A humbler version would be "watakushi". In everyday talk, there's indeed a gender distinction. Women will rather use "watashi" or "atashi" whereas men will use "boku" or "ore" (informal). Some women may use "boku" as well but I don't think it's really common though. There are lots of grammatical stuff like that. For instance, to express approval, a man would say "sou da ne" but a woman would say "sou ne"... So there's a manly speach and a womanly speach in japanese, so to speak. So, well yeah, the japanese language is not anti-sexist but most languages aren't either. It's just expressed in different ways. French has grammatical feminine and masculine, japanese hasn't really.
Hope this will help. :)
...ou je vous arrache les particules avec du flan que même un osthéopathe il s'en fera rembourser le dos !

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Re: konnichiwa mina-san

Messagede Invite10013 » 29 Aoû 2014, 16:17

yapuka a écrit:"watashi" means "je" for male and female. But, like in french, japanese people can use slang, as for males : "boku" which means the same thing but in different degree of language.
I'm not sure but I think there are 7 ways to says "je" in japanese.
They use the same kind of difference when they use -kun for a boy and -chan for a girl.


yes, but -chan at the base is supposed to be an adaptation of -san for young children who do not yet know how to say the sound [s]. Also known as babies -chan indifferently sex, and girls may have the suffix -kun in certain circumstances. Sexualization comes later, and I do not know if we -chan uses to adulthood in the world of work, for example?

Luisão : Thank you, is very clear^^ I know that languages ​​are far from neutral and French is far from shining in this area ^^ but it intrigues me that there have different ways of talking about yourself, I guess it looks like our "e "that discriminate against women.
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Re: konnichiwa mina-san

Messagede Luisão » 29 Aoû 2014, 17:18

"kun" is sometimes used to address a woman though, and "chan" may be used for a man too (in that case it sounds more like a nickname and denotes affection). But generally speaking "san" is neutral, -kun for men and -chan for children and women. On a working place -san is more appropriate, formal. Although -kun and -chan may be used when speaking to a colleague (not your boss obviously). But I may be wrong. My knowledge of japanese in use is far from extensive. :roll:
...ou je vous arrache les particules avec du flan que même un osthéopathe il s'en fera rembourser le dos !

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Re: konnichiwa mina-san

Messagede Fushichô » 29 Aoû 2014, 18:43

I agree with everything Luisão has explained. :)
I'll just add that, apparently, "boku" is more and more used by young women/female teenagers. According to my teachers, the gender gap in the way Japanese speak is (very) slowly shrinking and women speak more and more "like men".
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